Cat Vaccinations And Cats Viruses

Why and how might my cat become infected?

To keep your cat safe during the summer, take the following precautions: install snug and sturdy screens in all your windows. If you have adjustable screens, please make sure that they are tightly wedged into window frames. Note that cats can slip through childproof window guards—these don’t provide adequate protection! there are several reported routes of transmission of the rabies virus. Rabies is most often transmitted through a bite from an infected animal. Less frequently, it can be passed on when the saliva of an infected animal enters another animal’s body through mucous membranes or an open, fresh wound.

Vaccines for feline herpesvirus (fhv-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV) are always combined, as these two viruses together are the main causes of upper respiratory tract infections in cats (cat flu). Affected cats typically show sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, eye discharge, and mouth ulcers. Clinical signs vary from mild to extremely severe, and occasionally other complications may develop including viral pneumonia. With fhv-1, even after the initial signs subside, most cats will remain permanently infected with the virus and some go on to develop recurrent eye infections or other signs.

On This Page Why and how might my cat become infected? What are the treatment options for cats with calicivirus? Zoonotic Disease: What Can I Catch from My Cat? What can I do to protect my cat and myself? Cat flu key facts What causes cat flu? How is cat flu treated? Are there long-term consequences of cat flu? Can cat flu be prevented? Why and how might my cat become infected? To keep your cat safe during the summer, take the following precautions: install snug and sturdy screens in all your windows. cats If you have adjustable screens, please make sure that they are tightly wedged into window frames. Note that cats can slip through childproof window guards—these don’t provide adequate protection! there are several reported routes of transmission of the rabies virus. Rabies is most often transmitted through a bite from an infected animal. Less frequently, it can be passed on when the saliva of an infected animal enters another animal’s body through mucous membranes or an open, fresh wound. All cats and kittens receive f3 vaccination, but the use of fiv or felv vaccines is reserved for those either: going outside in areas with high prevalence living with known infected cats. Vaccines for feline herpes virus (fhv-1) and feline calicivirus (fcv) are always combined, as these two viruses together are the main causes of upper respiratory tract infections in cats (cat flu). Affected cats typically show sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, eye discharge, and mouth ulcers. Clinical signs vary from mild to extremely severe, and occasionally other complications may develop including viral pneumonia. With fhv-1, even after the initial signs subside, most cats will remain permanently infected with the virus and some go on to develop recurrent eye infections or other signs. What are the treatment options for cats with calicivirus? Indoor cats need vaccines- park pet hospital the short answer is yes. There are two vaccines that are recommended for indoor cats. One is a combination vaccine which is abbreviated to fvrcp (stands for: feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia). The diseases this vaccine protects against are devastating if not fatal. These diseases are viruses which survive in the environment and are transmitted on objects including our own shoes, blankets, brushes, clothing, food bowls ect. Some of the virus’ are also airborne. Regular traffic in and our of your home exposes your cat to these viruses. cat An unprotected cat that is exposed to these viruses can suffer chronic upper respiratory infections, life threatening pneumonia, life threatening diarrhea, and body wide sepsis. December 2, 2020 contains gentamicin as a preservative. Thank you for your question. Thank you for your question. Safety and immunogenicity of this product have been demonstrated by vaccination and challenge tests in susceptible cats. We have given the first time amoxicillin and now zithromax. I'm sorry that she is having problems. A 1-ml dose of purevax rabies is injected under the skin. Duration of immunity after revaccination: 3 years. Adult cats from a community trap–neuter–return programme were given trivalent mlv core vaccine (fpv, fhv‐1, fcv) into the distal third of the dorsal tail with inactivated rabies vaccine administered 2 cm distal to the site of the trivalent vaccination. In rare instances, administration of vaccines may cause lethargy, fever, and inflammatory or hypersensitivity types of reactions. A 5-year-old cat with nasal discharge and sneezing is presented at your practice. What are your differential diagnoses? what diagnostics do you pursue? depending on the diagnosis, what treatment options can you initiate? upper respiratory tract (urt) diseases are remarkably common in cats and can be both challenging in the acute state and frustrating in the chronic state. The objective of this review article is to discuss the approach to evaluating a cat with clinical signs attributable to the urt. Zoonotic Disease: What Can I Catch from My Cat? Cats are independent, intelligent, and highly sociable beings. When they are comfortable at home, they will let you know. Because they love to go on little excursions and have their own private time, it is vital to protect cats and ensure they are safe from catching infectious diseases. The rspca australia recommends cat containment to protect both your pet and the local wildlife. There are several vaccines available for cats, which has led to some debate about the dangers of excessive vaccination. While some vets believe all vaccines are a good idea, others think getting too many may jeopardise your cat’s health. If your cat has had regular vaccinations throughout their life, they may have some protection covering them for approximately two to three months after the date their vaccine was due, but once this time has lapsed they will be at a higher risk of catching some of the diseases we vaccinate against. Follow our guidance below until they are fully protected again: if he/she is a house cat, continue to keep him/her indoors and stop any other cats coming into the house. Keep your cat indoors to minimize the risk of exposure to infected animals. Properly isolate infected cats to protect other pets living in the same environment. Minimize stress. Keep your cat up to date on vaccines as recommended by your vet. Vaccines for upper respiratory disease in cats may not actually prevent infection, but they help lessen the severity of the disease in some cases. Regular veterinary exams and preventative care can help catch and treat problems early. A cat’s best defense against upper respiratory infection is a healthy immune system. What can I do to protect my cat and myself? Vaccines are substances created to prime or stimulate your cat’s immune system to help prevent or fight off certain types of infections. Over time, this stimulation decreases and the immune system cannot protect itself from the diseases any longer. Once this occurs, your cat is not “up to date” on their vaccinations and need to be re-vaccinated, also known as boostering. Though cancer can be diagnosed in cats of all ages and breeds, it is much more common in older cats. Certain breeds are prone to specific cancers, but cats with white ears and heads are particularly susceptible to skin cancer. Ask your vet if your cat falls into specific at-risk categories. Cancer prevention keeping your cat indoors will protect her from certain skin cancers caused by repeated sun exposure and sunburn. Breast cancer is a common cancer for cats, but it can be avoided by having your cat spayed before her first heat cycle. Just as in humans, vaccinating your cat helps to protect him or her against several serious and/or life-threatening diseases. Anyone who cares for his or her cat will want to protect it in this way and vaccination is a critical part of a proper preventive healthcare programme. A vaccine is usually given by an injection under the skin, although sometimes may be given as drops into the eyes or nose. It is a preparation designed to provide protection against a specific infectious disease through stimulating an immune response that will protect the cat if it is subsequently exposed to the infection. Cat flu key facts Dog vaccinations near me vaccinations play an important role in protecting your dog from dangerous and potentially fatal diseases like parvovirus, canine hepatitis and kennel cough. Flea and tick prevention we recommend administering flea and tick prevention every 30 days starting at 8 weeks of age. – click here for more information on this policy. All puppies should be immunized against parvovirus, distemper, rabies and hepatitis. Come inside with your pet. These vaccination clinics, held in conjunction with the texas coalition for animal protection (tcap), are normally held from 10 a. M. To 12 p. M. At the collin county animal shelter. If restraining your pet for a nail trim is too stressful for him or her, we may refer you to a full service clinic. Core vaccines are those that all cats should receive to protect them against key diseases including enteritis (feline panleukopaenia, a parvovirus) and cat flu (feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus). This vaccination combination is commonly known as the f3 vaccination. Non-core vaccines are those that should only be given to cats in specific risk categories based on an individual risk/benefit assessment [ 2 ]. This assessment will take into account the geographical location, lifestyle and risk of exposure to the infection of the individual cat. Examples of no-core vaccines include feline leukaemia virus (felv) and feline immunodeficiency virus (fiv). At the eighth passage, crfk (feline kidney) cells inoculated with a urine sample (761u) positive for fmopv showed cytopathic effects (cpes) at day 14, in the form of cell rounding, followed by cell detachment from the monolayer and cell lysis. At the 16th passage, cpes were evident at day 10, with syncytia formation ( fig. 3a ). Rt-pcr for fmopv using the culture supernatants and cell lysates showed positive results in crfk cells inoculated with urine sample 761u and veroe6 (african green monkey kidney) cells inoculated with supernatant of crfk cells positive for fmopv. Specific apple green finely granular and diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence was also observed by using serum from guinea pig immunized with recombinant n protein of fmopv or corresponding serum of the infected cat ( fig. What causes cat flu? Cats need to be protected against the below serious and sometime fatal diseases: feline enteritis – this is the most common disease that affects cats. It is a very contagious and is highly life threatening especially in kittens under 12 months of age. The most common symptoms are: high fever, depression, dehydration, severe stomach pain, vomiting diarrhoea and dehydration. Feline respiratory disease (cat flu) – cats of all ages can contract this disease as it is highly contagious. Symptoms of this are sneezing, nasal discharge, runny eyes, coughing, loss of appetite and ulcers on their tongues, in their mouths and on their nose, if left untreated this disease can cause severe dehydration. Bordetella bronchiseptica is another bacterial infection that can be a part of the upper respiratory infection complex (cat flu) in cats. It is not as common as fhv-1 or fcv (see above), but can sometimes be a problem especially in stressed cats and cats from large colonies. The bacterium can also be an occasional cause of pneumonia in young kittens. Cats with bordetella bronchispetica can be treated effectively with appropriate antibiotics, and vaccination is not required in most cats. However, in colonies of cats with repeated outbreaks of disease, vaccination may play a role in helping protect cats. There is no accurate test to diagnose rabies in live animals. The direct fluorescent antibody test is the most accurate test for diagnosis, but it can only be performed after the death of the animal. The rabies virus can incubate in a cat’s body anywhere from just one week to more than a year before the virus appears in the saliva and the cat is capable of transmitting the disease. When the animal becomes infectious, symptoms appear quickly. It is possible for a cat, or dog, to shed the virus for several days before clinical signs appear. How is cat flu treated? There are two main viruses which cause what is commonly referred to as ‘cat flu’. These are feline rhinotracheitis and feline calicivirus and they are present all year round in the united kingdom cat population. Cat flu spreads very easily by direct and indirect contact between cats. Cats entering shows or being boarded during holidays are particularly at risk because they are placed in close proximity to each other. Signs of the disease are a runny nose, weepy eyes, sneezing, coughing and lethargy. If treated promptly, cat flu is hardly ever fatal, but can make your cat ill for some time and may leave it with snuffles and breathing difficulties for the rest of its life. Cat flu is a general term for a highly contagious upper respiratory disease that affects cats and kittens. This disease is caused by one or more viruses including feline herpes virus 1 (fhv1) and feline calicivirus (fvc). These viruses produces symptoms similar to the common cold in humans. Symptoms include sneezing, discharge from the eyes or nose, fever, breathing problems, coughing, fatigue and loss of appetite. Cats can also develop ulcers on the mouth or eyes. If the condition becomes severe and is not treated, it can cause permanent eye damage, pneumonia or even death. Kittens and older cats are the worst affected due to lower immunity. Anaphylaxis is an extreme emergency. Your veterinarian will begin immediate emergency life support including establishing an open airway, oxygen administration, intravenous fluids to increase blood pressure and drugs such as epinephrine, diphenhydramine and corticosteroids. Cats that survive the first few minutes usually return to normal health. Anaphylaxis usually occurs soon after vaccination, often while the cat is still in the veterinary clinic. Urticaria occurs soon after vaccination, often shortly after the animal gets home. Your veterinarian will recommend immediate return to the hospital for treatment. An oral antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (benadryl®) may be recommended to initiate treatment. Urticaria is usually treated successfully with injectable corticosteroids like dexamethasone or prednisone. Antihistamines do little to help with acute allergic reactions but may be given by injection to help prevent recurrence of symptoms after steroids wear off. Are there long-term consequences of cat flu? Share email vaccine side effects are an occasional complication of feline vaccinations, but are often minor problems when compared to the symptoms of cat flu. Caused by bacteria and viruses like the feline herpes virus (fhv-1), also known as feline rhinotracheitis virus, and feline calcivirus (fcv), so-called 'cat flu' can affect the respiratory system of cats of every age, with more serious consequences for young kittens or elderly cats with weak immune systems. Some diseases can be passed on to your pet’s offspring, often with fatal consequences. For example, cat flu can be life-threatening in young kittens; even if they survive, they often become carriers and can have long term health issues. Adult cats with long term cat flu are usually the source of infection in kittens. Can cat flu be prevented? There is no specific treatment for most of the viruses that affect our pets today and we at the healthy pet club believe that 'prevention is better than cure'. Cat flu is still a very common disease, and sadly we also often see cats that have been infected with feline leukaemia virus, a frequently fatal disease. Both of these and many other diseases can be prevented or kept to a minimum just by a simple vaccination. Why vaccination is important cats of all ages can and do become seriously ill or die from infectious diseases that could have been prevented through vaccination. Vaccination offers the most effective way of protecting your cat against many of the most serious infectious diseases, including cat flu, feline infectious enteritis, feline leukaemia virus and chlamydophila. Many of these diseases are commonly reported in the uk, and they represent a potentially significant threat to your pet’s health. Uris are common, as the causative viruses are widespread in cat populations. Typical risk factors include: cats kept in large groups or colonies such as breeding catteries, rescue centres and feral cat colonies – in these situations the viruses are able to spread easily unvaccinated cats elderly and immunosuppressed cats (e. G. , cats with felv or fiv infection, or cats receiving immunosuppressive therapy) are more vulnerable to developing severe disease. Testing: the fiv test routinely carried out in veterinary practices detects antibodies, which develop four to six weeks after infection, but this test is often unreliable as to whether the cat has the virus. Positive test results obtained by using this simple 'elisa' test (sometimes called a cite test, or 'combo' test,) should be confirmed by an ifa test (immuno-fluorescent antibody test) or a western blot, as quite often false positives can occur. Some of the elisa tests are so inaccurate as to make the whole test meaningless, and are producing 'false positives' (due to reacting with a variety of other compounds in the cat's blood). According to the glasgow companion animal diagnostic unit web-site (where they give the results of an on-going survey), up to 7% of positive results with the elisa test are negative when checked by the more accurate ifa test.

What are the treatment options for cats with calicivirus?

Indoor cats need vaccines- park pet hospital the short answer is yes. There are two vaccines that are recommended for indoor cats. One is a combination vaccine which is abbreviated to fvrcp (stands for feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia). The diseases this vaccine protects against are devastating if not fatal. These diseases are viruses which survive in the environment and are transmitted on objects including our own shoes, blankets, brushes, clothing, food bowls etc. Some of the virus’ are also airborne. Regular traffic in and out of your home exposes your cat to these viruses. An unprotected cat that is exposed to these viruses can suffer chronic upper respiratory infections, life-threatening pneumonia, life-threatening diarrhoea, and body-wide sepsis.

December 2, 2020, contains gentamicin as a preservative. Thank you for your question. Thank you for your question. Safety and immunogenicity of this product have been demonstrated by vaccination and challenge tests in susceptible cats. We have given the first time amoxicillin and now Zithromax. I’m sorry that she is having problems. A 1-ml dose of purevax rabies is injected under the skin. Duration of immunity after revaccination: 3 years. Adult cats from a community trap–neuter–return programme were given trivalent mlv core vaccine (fpv, fhv‐1, fcv) into the distal third of the dorsal tail with inactivated rabies vaccine administered 2 cm distal to the site of the trivalent vaccination. In rare instances, the administration of vaccines may cause lethargy, fever, and inflammatory or hypersensitivity types of reactions.

A 5-year-old cat with nasal discharge and sneezing is presented at your practice. What are your differential diagnoses? what diagnostics do you pursue? depending on the diagnosis, what treatment options can you initiate? upper respiratory tract (URT) diseases are remarkably common in cats and can be both challengings in the acute state and frustrating in the chronic state. The objective of this review article is to discuss the approach to evaluating a cat with clinical signs attributable to the urt.

Zoonotic Disease: What Can I Catch from My Cat?

Cats are independent, intelligent, and highly sociable beings. When they are comfortable at home, they will let you know. Because they love to go on little excursions and have their own private time, it is vital to protect cats and ensure they are safe from catching infectious diseases. The RSPCA Australia recommends cat containment to protect both your pet and the local wildlife. There are several vaccines available for cats, which has led to some debate about the dangers of excessive vaccination. While some vets believe all vaccines are a good idea, others think getting too many may jeopardise your cat’s health.

If your cat has had regular vaccinations throughout their life, they may have some protection covering them for approximately two to three months after the date their vaccine was due, but once this time has lapsed they will be at a higher risk of catching some of the diseases we vaccinate against. Follow our guidance below until they are fully protected again: if he/she is a house cat, continue to keep him/her indoors and stop any other cats coming into the house.

Keep your cat indoors to minimize the risk of exposure to infected animals. Properly isolate infected cats to protect other pets living in the same environment. Minimize stress. Keep your cat up to date on vaccines as recommended by your vet. Vaccines for upper respiratory disease in cats may not actually prevent infection, but they help lessen the severity of the disease in some cases. Regular veterinary exams and preventative care can help catch and treat problems early. A cat’s best defence against upper respiratory infection is a healthy immune system.

What can I do to protect my cat and myself?

Vaccines are substances created to prime or stimulate your cat’s immune system to help prevent or fight off certain types of infections. Over time, this stimulation decreases and the immune system cannot protect itself from the diseases any longer. Once this occurs, your cat is not “up to date” on their vaccinations and need to be re-vaccinated, also known as Boostering.

Though cancer can be diagnosed in cats of all ages and breeds, it is much more common in older cats. Certain breeds are prone to specific cancers, but cats with white ears and heads are particularly susceptible to skin cancer. Ask your vet if your cat falls into specific at-risk categories. Cancer prevention keeping your cat indoors will protect her from certain skin cancers caused by repeated sun exposure and sunburn. Breast cancer is common cancer for cats, but it can be avoided by having your cat spayed before her first heat cycle.

Just as in humans, vaccinating your cat helps to protect him or her against several serious and/or life-threatening diseases. Anyone who cares for his or her cat will want to protect it in this way and vaccination is a critical part of a proper preventive healthcare programme. A vaccine is usually given by an injection under the skin, although sometimes may be given as drops into the eyes or nose. It is a preparation designed to provide protection against a specific infectious disease through stimulating an immune response that will protect the cat if it is subsequently exposed to the infection.

blue eyed cat

Cat flu key facts

Dog vaccinations near me vaccinations play an important role in protecting your dog from dangerous and potentially fatal diseases like parvovirus, canine hepatitis and kennel cough. Flea and tick prevention we recommend administering flea and tick prevention every 30 days starting at 8 weeks of age.  All puppies should be immunized against parvovirus, distemper, rabies and hepatitis. Come inside with your pet. These vaccination clinics, held in conjunction with the texas coalition for animal protection (tcap), are normally held from 10 a. M. To 12 p. M. At the collin county animal shelter. If restraining your pet for a nail trim is too stressful for him or her, we may refer you to a full-service clinic.

Core vaccines are those that all cats should receive to protect them against key diseases including enteritis (feline panleukopaenia, a parvovirus) and cat flu (feline calicivirus and feline herpesvirus). This vaccination combination is commonly known as f3 vaccination. Non-core vaccines are those that should only be given to cats in specific risk categories based on an individual risk/benefit assessment [ 2 ]. This assessment will take into account the geographical location, lifestyle and risk of exposure to the infection of the individual cat. Examples of non-core vaccines include feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

At the eighth passage, crfk (feline kidney) cells inoculated with a urine sample (761u) positive for fmopv showed cytopathic effects (cpes) at day 14, in the form of cell rounding, followed by cell detachment from the monolayer and cell lysis. At the 16th passage, cpes were evident at day 10, with syncytia formation ( fig. 3a ). Rt-PCR for fmopv using the culture supernatants and cell lysates showed positive results in crfk cells inoculated with urine sample 761u and veroe6 (African green monkey kidney) cells inoculated with supernatant of crfk cells positive for fmopv. Specific apple green finely granular and diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence was also observed by using serum from guinea pig immunized with recombinant n protein of fmopv or corresponding serum of the infected cat.

What causes cat flu?

Cats need to be protected against the below serious and sometimes fatal diseases: feline enteritis – this is the most common disease that affects cats. It is very contagious and is highly life-threatening especially in kittens under 12 months of age. The most common symptoms are high fever, depression, dehydration, severe stomach pain, vomiting diarrhoea and dehydration. Feline respiratory disease (cat flu) – cats of all ages can contract this disease as it is highly contagious. Symptoms of this are sneezing, nasal discharge, runny eyes, coughing, loss of appetite and ulcers on their tongues, in their mouths and on their nose, if left untreated this disease can cause severe dehydration.

Bordetella bronchiseptica is another bacterial infection that can be a part of the upper respiratory infection complex (cat flu) in cats. It is not as common as fhv-1 or FCV (see above), but can sometimes be a problem especially in stressed cats and cats from large colonies. The bacterium can also be an occasional cause of pneumonia in young kittens. Cats with bordetella bronchispetica can be treated effectively with appropriate antibiotics, and vaccination is not required in most cats. However, in colonies of cats with repeated outbreaks of disease, vaccination may play a role in helping protect cats.

There is no accurate test to diagnose rabies in live animals. The direct fluorescent antibody test is the most accurate test for diagnosis, but it can only be performed after the death of the animal. The rabies virus can incubate in a cat’s body anywhere from just one week to more than a year before the virus appears in the saliva and the cat is capable of transmitting the disease. When the animal becomes infectious, symptoms appear quickly. It is possible for a cat, or dog, to shed the virus for several days before clinical signs appear.

How is cat flu treated?

There are two main viruses which cause what is commonly referred to as ‘cat flu’. These are feline rhinotracheitis and feline calicivirus and they are present all year round in the united kingdom cat population. Cat flu spreads very easily by direct and indirect contact between cats. Cats entering shows or being boarded during holidays are particularly at risk because they are placed in close proximity to each other. Signs of the disease are a runny nose, weepy eyes, sneezing, coughing and lethargy. If treated promptly, cat flu is hardly ever fatal, but can make your cat ill for some time and may leave it with snuffles and breathing difficulties for the rest of its life.

Cat flu is a general term for a highly contagious upper respiratory disease that affects cats and kittens. This disease is caused by one or more viruses including feline herpesvirus 1 (fhv1) and feline calicivirus (fvc). These viruses produce symptoms similar to the common cold in humans. Symptoms include sneezing, discharge from the eyes or nose, fever, breathing problems, coughing, fatigue and loss of appetite. Cats can also develop ulcers on the mouth or eyes. If the condition becomes severe and is not treated, it can cause permanent eye damage, pneumonia or even death. Kittens and older cats are the worst affected due to lower immunity.

Anaphylaxis is an extreme emergency. Your veterinarian will begin immediate emergency life support including establishing an open airway, oxygen administration, intravenous fluids to increase blood pressure and drugs such as epinephrine, diphenhydramine and corticosteroids. Cats that survive the first few minutes usually return to normal health. Anaphylaxis usually occurs soon after vaccination, often while the cat is still in the veterinary clinic. Urticaria occurs soon after vaccination, often shortly after the animal gets home. Your veterinarian will recommend an immediate return to the hospital for treatment. An oral antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (benadryl®) may be recommended to initiate treatment. Urticaria is usually treated successfully with injectable corticosteroids like dexamethasone or prednisone. Antihistamines do little to help with acute allergic reactions but may be given by injection to help prevent recurrence of symptoms after steroids wear off.

Are there long-term consequences of cat flu?

Share email vaccine side effects are an occasional complication of feline vaccinations but are often minor problems when compared to the symptoms of cat flu. Caused by bacteria and viruses like the feline herpesvirus (fhv-1), also known as a feline rhinotracheitis virus, and feline calicivirus (fcv), so-called ‘cat flu’ can affect the respiratory system of cats of every age, with more serious consequences for young kittens or elderly cats with weak immune systems.

Some diseases can be passed on to your pet’s offspring, often with fatal consequences. For example, cat flu can be life-threatening in young kittens; even if they survive, they often become carriers and can have long term health issues. Adult cats with long term cat flu are usually the source of infection in kittens.

Can cat flu be prevented?

There is no specific treatment for most of the viruses that affect our pets today and we at the healthy pet club believe that ‘prevention is better than cure’. Cat flu is still a very common disease, and sadly we also often see cats that have been infected with feline leukaemia virus, a frequently fatal disease. Both of these and many other diseases can be prevented or kept to a minimum just by a simple vaccination.

Why vaccination is important cats of all ages can and do become seriously ill or die from infectious diseases that could have been prevented through vaccination. Vaccination offers the most effective way of protecting your cat against many of the most serious infectious diseases, including cat flu, feline infectious enteritis, feline leukaemia virus and chlamydophila. Many of these diseases are commonly reported in the UK, and they represent a potentially significant threat to your pet’s health.

Uris are common, as the causative viruses are widespread in cat populations. Typical risk factors include cats kept in large groups or colonies such as breeding catteries, rescue centres and feral cat colonies – in these situations the viruses are able to spread easily unvaccinated cats elderly and immunosuppressed cats (e. G., cats with FeLV or FIV infection, or cats receiving immunosuppressive therapy) are more vulnerable to developing severe disease.

Testing: the fiv test routinely carried out in veterinary practices detects antibodies, which develop four to six weeks after infection, but this test is often unreliable as to whether the cat has the virus. Positive test results obtained by using this simple ‘ELISA’ test (sometimes called a cite test, or ‘combo’ test,) should be confirmed by an ifa test (immuno-fluorescent antibody test) or a western blot, as quite often false positives can occur. Some of the Elisa tests are so inaccurate as to make the whole test meaningless and are producing ‘false positives’ (due to reacting with a variety of other compounds in the cat’s blood). According to the Glasgow companion animal diagnostic unit web-site (where they give the results of an on-going survey), up to 7% of positive results with the ELISA test are negative when checked by the more accurate ifa test.

The post Cat Vaccinations And Cats Viruses appeared first on Catnip Utopia.

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